Email Scripts That Work

One of the unfortunate realities facing real estate agents today is sending an email to a home buyer or seller and receiving no reply.What happened?

You already made initial contact with that lead, said all the right things, thought you made a connection, and now... crickets. Or perhaps you received a reply email from a passive buyer or an undecided seller that contained mixed messages about what they want to do or whether they want to proceed with you as their agent. Until recently, email has been a prospect’s preferred method of communication with you, but these days there’s little indication that your messages are getting through.

Not every email will be opened or responded to, but name recognition through repetition can prompt a prospect to reach out months or even years after your initial contact. At the end of the day, you’re looking for a response—any response—to help you better manage your leads. How can you craft an email that will get your lead’s attention?

Well, people who lack the creative feather, we are here to save the day!

Use these helpful scripts to make your message compelling enough for a lead to open, read and take action.
 
 
Second contact with a buyer

You might have already emailed a buyer to introduce yourself and your services, but you haven’t heard back yet. Your next email can pick up the previous conversation where you left off. To avoid sounding too aggressive, be sure to reiterate the topic you and the buyer discussed earlier.
 
Subject: your question regarding 10 Main Street

Hi Mr. Smith, 

Thanks again for contacting me about the house at 10 Main Street on Tuesday.

I emailed you about going around to take a look at it, and possibly other houses in the area, so I’m checking in for a good time to schedule that. What is the best way to connect with you: text, email, or cellphone? You can reply back to this email, or give me a call or text at 123-345-6789, and we’ll get started finding your next home.

Talk to you soon,

Bob Jones
 
Second contact with a passive buyer or a buyer you sent listings to
 
Subject: Your interest in Pleasantville California

Hi Mr. Smith,

Thanks again for taking a minute to chat with me on Tuesday. I understand not feeling ready to look at properties: it’s a big decision and there is a lot to think about. After we spoke, I set you up to receive an occasional email with listings similar to what we discussed. I’m hoping they piqued your interest, so shoot me an email or give me a call at 123-345-6789 to chat; I want to make sure I’m sending you what you need. Thanks again for your time. If you have any questions, please let me know!

Bob Jones
 
 
Second contact with seller
 
Subject: Mr. Smith, let's chat regarding selling your home

Hi Mr. Smith,

Thanks again for taking a minute to chat with me on [conversation date] about selling your home. I strive to make the selling experience as comfortable and enjoyable as possible. Is [previously discussed date range] still your timeline for selling your home?

I will create a custom home valuation report for your property and get in touch with you shortly with the finished report. In the meantime, please visit my website www.website.com or, if you have any questions, feel free to email or call me at 123-345-6789.

Thanks again for your time!

Bob Jones


Offer to hook up buyers with lenders

Somewhere along the line, there are interim steps you need to take on the path between converting a passive buyer and receiving the commission check. When you identify where a passive buyer is in their process, you can request more specific information in your emails to nudge them toward closing.

This is a good way to gauge how prepared buyers are to act, and an email from you gives them time to really think about it. If a buyer isn’t ready to talk about mortgages and how much they can afford to spend, they’re definitely not ready to look at homes.

The financing component is an easy topic to float because, since lending isn’t your primary role as a real estate agent, it’s clear you don’t benefit by asking the buyer about it. Instead, you position yourself as knowledgeable, well-connected, and action-oriented.

Subject: I have a lender for you

Mr. Smith,

Thanks again for contacting me about the house at 10 Main Street on Tuesday. I’m looking forward to helping you find your dream home!

I’d like to take you to see some listings, but I want to make sure I’ve found the right ones for your price range. Have you spoken with a lender about getting pre-qualified? If not, I have a great lender that I partner with. May I give her your email or phone so she can contact you?

Thanks for getting back to me; it will really help get the ball rolling!

Bob Jones


Offering to connect buyers with lenders also gives you a natural opportunity to follow up later with buyers.

Hi Mr. Smith.

Thanks again for contacting me on [conversation date] about the house at [address]. I’m looking forward to helping you find your dream home!

When we spoke 6 weeks ago, you weren’t ready to talk to a lender, so I’m just following up to see where you are. If you’ve had that conversation, let me know what your price range is and I’ll schedule us to go view some listings. When is the best time for you?

If you haven’t been pre-qualified yet, I have a great lender that I partner with. May I give her your email or phone so she can contact you?

Thanks for letting me know what your status is so that we can get started on the next step.

Bob Jones
 
 
Define a buyer’s needs versus their wants
 
There can be a huge difference between what a buyer needs to have versus what they’d like to have. Be specific in your emails when asking for clarification so that you know what the buyer is looking for and to show that you were paying attention during your previous conversation.

Hi Mr. Smith,

Thanks again for taking a minute to chat with me on Tuesday about buying a home. I’m sure I can help you find one you will love. I have just a couple questions to help me identify the right listings to send you:

• You mentioned wanting three bedrooms—do you still need it to be three? Would two bedrooms suffice?

• Since we last touched base, has there been any change regarding the length of the desired commute you mentioned?

Thanks for taking a moment to reply; it will really help me narrow down the search for your dream home!

Bob Jones
 

Limit the number of clarifying questions—or requests for action—to, say, three at a time so that you don’t overwhelm the client. A shorter email with a clear CTA (call to action) may prompt a client to realize that complex or extensive action isn’t required, and they might act on it sooner.

Always let the buyer or seller know you’re asking these questions because you’re trying to better understand their needs.